Blog

  • 08
    May

    Entrepreneurship education can help to deliver a stronger Europe

    Diana Filip, Deputy CEO I VP for Marketing and Development, JA Europe

    What young people expect from the EU
    Tomorrow, on Europe Day, EU Heads of State will renew their commitment to an EU that delivers on the issues that really matter to its citizens. The EU and its Member States are facing challenging times with rising social unrest, paired with weak economic performances. Leaders will need to prioritise to make change happen quickly, visibly and sustainably.

    Ahead of the Informal European Council in Sibiu, the European Commission’s Eurobarometer gathered the views of young Europeans on how to build a stronger, more united Europe. This is what they say:

    “Young people expect schools to prepare them for employment and to think critically. They consider the main shortcomings of schools currently to be not dedicating enough attention to entrepreneurship and financial competences; and climate change, environment and eco-friendly behaviours”.

    Indeed, one out of two young Europeans upholds that the most important thing schools should offer young people is adequate preparation for employment. Almost 50% of young Europeans are calling for the promotion of creativity, adaptability and an entrepreneurial mind-set.

    Entrepreneurship education is part of the solution

    The feedback from these young Europeans sounds very familiar to us at JA Europe. In a recent survey we conducted together with ERT, the European Round Table of Industrialists, themed “Why Europe matters for youth” 4,500 young people confirmed that youth employment (78%) was a key priority for them.

    We are convinced about the need to prepare young people for their future work life. For the last 100 years, JA has provided young people with education programmes for entrepreneurship, work readiness and financial literacy. In the last school year alone, the JA network in Europe reached more than 4 million young people across 40 countries, with the support of 140,000 business volunteers and 130,000 teachers and educators.

    Beyond preparing young Europeans for a brighter future, entrepreneurship education can also contribute towards a brighter future for the EU. The “Why Europe matters” survey also demonstrated that young people with an entrepreneurship education experience readily grasp the benefits of the EU and are more positive about the future of the EU.

    As Heads of State gather in Romania to repeat their pledge to an EU that delivers on the issues that matter to citizens, JA Europe calls for an improved intake of entrepreneurship education at the national level, across Europe. We recommend that every young person should have at least one practical entrepreneurial experience before leaving school.

    We believe that Europe’s youth remains the EU’s greatest source of inspiration and opportunity. Only by engaging with the visions, concerns and ideas of our young citizens, can Europe overcome its challenges and renew its confidence. 

    For more details, please check out the full policy recommendations of our Entrepreneurship Education hub of experts, the EE-HUB. http://www.ee-hub.eu/

  • 19
    Mar

    JA mentors are model examples from the varied world of work

    Lauren Lane, a 22-year-old cloud automation engineer at Citi, is one of thousands of Junior Achievement Ireland (JAI) volunteers who mentor and help students in primary and second level schools across Ireland. Responding to demand from schools, JAI recruits, vets, trains, equips and supports volunteers from the business world to facilitate programmes spanning four themes: entrepreneurship, employability, financial literacy and the value of STEM.

    The programmes are designed to complement the formal curriculum and allow students to
    learn from the experiences of their volunteer. A survey of more than 700 JAI volunteers last year showed that 77 per cent felt their communication skills had improved, 59 per cent had increased their confidence, and 99 per cent would recommend a JA programme to a colleague.

    Strategic thinking and progressing through their studies with an open mind is wise advice for students in 2019. Research from the World’s Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs report found the workplace and many of our traditional job roles are changing drastically. Some 65 per cent of the jobs the next generation will be hired for do not even exist today. By 2025, it is predicted that six million low-qualified jobs will potentially disappear while 15 million jobs requiring high educational attainment will be created.

    Lauren is delighted to be involved as Citi volunteer, having enjoyed JA programmes during every year of her primary school education.

    “Completing the JA programmes helped to open my eyes to the opportunities that were out there,” said Lane. “I went on to be a female in the world of tech after studying Business and Computing at the National College of Art and Design. I decided to ‘pay it forward’ and be a volunteer because I want other students to get what I did from the JA programmes, to see all the different possibilities that are out there.

    "I want to be a role model for girls in tech because you can’t be what you can’t see, and those students can see what I have accomplished and learn about how they too can achieve whatever they want.”

     

    Reprinted from Business Post

    https://www.businesspost.ie/focus-on/leading-roles-jai-mentors-model-examples-varied-world-work-437516

     

     

  • 20
    Jun

    Students were invited to challenge and discover more about agriculture at Monsanto’s DEKALB Agricultural Innovation Camp in Turkey

    Onur Camili, Commercial Lead for Monsanto Turkey

    The second Monsanto DEKALB ‘Agricultural Innovation Camp’ was organised in May 2018 with cooperation of the Monsanto’s partnership with the Junior Achievement (JA) Award — Europe’s largest provider of education programmes for entrepreneurship — and my team in Turkey.

  • 08
    Jun

    Building bridges - Opening windows

    Maria Fridefors, Teacher

    Enterprise without Borders (EWB)

    Interested in upgrading the Entrepreneurship course to a new level and to create situations where your students get an opportunity to improve their language skills, expand their business talents and get a deeper understanding about international trading? Bring your passion for teaching, individual growth and the academic progress of each and every one of your students into the Entrepreneurship and Business courses and start a collaboration with a school and colleagues in another country! It could be a way to build bridges between people and encourage students to develop proficiencies valuable in a globalized world.

  • 08
    Feb

    More women like tech

    Åsa Arvidsson, CEO of Avanade Sweden

    Working in the IT industry, or the tech industry, as it is also called, does not have to be as technical as it sounds. As in many other areas people with a great understanding of other people's needs are needed also in the tech industry. This is what Åsa Arvidsson, CEO of Avanade Sweden says.

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